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EEF: business needs a bigger say over devolution

first_img Lauren Fedor Show Comments ▼ Monday 12 October 2015 12:00 am Share whatsapp A leading industry group is calling on the government to give businesses more influence over the devolution of powers to local authorities.In a new paper out today, the EEF, the manufacturers’ organisation, argues that firms “must be given a greater role in plans for devolution in England if the process is to result in genuine localism and a boost to private sector growth, investment and job creation”. whatsapp Calling the current relationship between businesses and local authorities “weak”, the EEF wants the government to give Local Enterprise Partner­ships (LEPs) an “enhanced role” in the transfer of powers from the national government to local authorities.The group has also asked for an amendment to the government’s cities and local government bill, in order to require an independent, business-led inquiry into devolution plans.EEF chief executive Terry Scuoler said devolution “must not be seen as an end in itself but a process aimed at tailoring local business environments to make them better places for business growth”. “Ultimately, local decision makers and businesses will need a sustained dialogue on how they can make their local areas places in which businesses can prosper,” Scuoler added.Scuoler is not the first business leader to demand that the government include firms in devolution plans. When chancellor George Osborne said last week that he would give “power to the people” by handing local authorities control over £26bn in revenues from business rates, British Chambers of Commerce (BCC) director-general John Longworth said it “[felt] like a set of impositions rather than a grand partnership”.“It is highly questionable for the chancellor to announce major changes to business rates without consulting broadly with the business communities that pay them,” Longworth added. EEF: business needs a bigger say over devolution last_img read more

Facing a broken mental health system, many U.S. teens fall off a dangerous ‘cliff’ in their care

first_img News Editor Those challenges have only been exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic, which has not only upended the way mental health care is delivered, but has also created conditions that could worsen existing mental health issues or lead to new ones. The crisis has also shuttered schools across the country, complicating matters for teenagers who access counseling through school.Without the right care, young people are at risk for a slew of problems, from housing instability to disruptions to their education.“This is the age at which kids stay on the curve, even with their illness, of the traditional developmental trajectory. Or they start to drop off treatment,” said Mark Schechter, a psychiatrist at North Shore Medical Center in Salem, Mass.“And when they start to drop off, all of these bad things start to happen,” he said.Kathleen Donohue, now 23, stopped getting mental health care when she moved away for college. Kathleen Donohue started therapy in high school. She was depressed, had self-harmed, and had misused prescription drugs. Her panic attacks, which started in elementary school, flared up in high school. She’d go to the health clinic and sit, breathing in and out of a paper bag.Donohue and her counselor met regularly, working on coping skills, building new relationships, and processing trauma from Donohue’s past. She got into college, threw away all her clothes, and went thrift shopping for a new wardrobe. She was desperate for a fresh start and was convinced college would be one.But moving didn’t mean her mental health conditions went away.“I just walked out of a traumatizing, toxic life, and then just thought I could make it on my own without getting treatment,” said Donohue, now a 23-year-old Florida college student.She doesn’t remember her therapist or anyone else ever talking to her about how hard that transition might be or how she could get therapy in college. The changes quickly took a toll. She was anxious, depressed again, and having suicidal thoughts, but wasn’t getting help.“I knew nobody in town … I didn’t know where to get therapy. I really was a kid who didn’t know where to go,” she said. Crisis counselors, the ‘paramedics of mental health,’ wage a wrenching battle on the coronavirus front lines Her anxiety made it difficult to go to some of her lectures. She started drinking and using drugs again, as she had in high school, before her diagnosis. She’d take Adderall in the mornings to stay awake. She failed several classes.None of it seemed all that out of the ordinary to her — it was college, and the issues seemed common among students. But now, she sees the changes as signs of her mental health tumbling as she went untreated.McKenzie transferred schools after her first year, and dropped out after her second. She was working in a restaurant when her mom, who had become involved with the National Alliance on Mental Illness, asked her to speak about her experiences at a local event. She now has a job running the social media account for her local NAMI branch and helping out in their office. She’s able to access therapy through her job.Teyah McKenzie was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in high school, but stopped getting therapy when she went to college. McKenzie, now 25, works at her local branch of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Experts said while the cliff affects many young people, others are able to make smooth transitions. They’re able to keep seeing their regular providers, or have a plan in place to shift to a new one. And for a seemingly smaller fraction of young people, including Lee Piechota, turning 18 is actually, in some ways, a boon for mental health care.Piechota, a 21-year old who lives in northeastern Pennsylvania and is transgender, grew up in an abusive household. At his mother’s suggestion, he started seeing a therapist around 13 or 14 who, to Piechota, seemed to try to change the subject or minimize his feelings when he brought up issues related to being transgender, like wanting to cut his hair and not being allowed to do so.Because he was a minor, the therapist frequently tried to loop Piechota’s mother into the appointments and would discuss him in front of his mother. That backfired.“I kind of shut myself off a little more,” he said. He stopped going to therapy for about a year.But when Piechota turned 18, he started seeing a new, much more validating therapist. He stopped living at home full-time, and the more welcoming environment made it much easier for him to make progress in his therapy. He started to take testosterone, a process his new therapist helped with.Now a speech therapy student, Piechota has also volunteered his time to train mental health providers about working with young people who are transgender. He also now leads two mental health support groups for teens.“It’s something I went through, and talking about it can help other people recognize what they’re going through,” he said.Lee Piechota, 21, now leads two mental health support groups for young people and has also helped train mental health providers in how best to work with young people who are transgender. It’s surprisingly difficult to measure the exact effect that turning 18 can have on mental health care. Though there are several large, well-respected federal research studies and insurance claims databases that look at mental health care in the U.S., nearly all of them break up “adolescent data” and “adult data” — often splitting the two groups right at the age of 18.Those that do include both age groups, such as the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, tend to ask children and adults different questions, making it difficult to compare how mental health conditions and care change as young people pass the cutoff into adulthood.There’s also relatively little research tracking the specifics of how young people access mental health care, how they pay for it, or how that changes over time as they enter into adulthood. Related: Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. About the Author Reprints Megan Thielking But many parents and teens aren’t prepared for the changes that come with being shuffled into adult care.“You’ve been the glue for your kids — making sure they get their medication, advocating for what they need, and suddenly no one is listening to you,” Schechter said.“For the kid, it becomes: How do I track appointments? How do I manage my medications? How do I talk to a provider? How do I track my symptoms? What if the doctor doesn’t seem to be listening to me?” he added.Those challenges are often tied up with other major changes that happen around the same time, like graduating high school and heading to college, or getting a job and moving out of a parent’s home.That was the case for Teyah McKenzie, a 25-year-old from Ohio. After being hospitalized and diagnosed with bipolar disorder in high school, she started getting mental health care, which helped stabilize some of her symptoms. But then her therapist went on maternity leave, and McKenzie started college.At 18, she didn’t understand how school might affect her mental health, or that she might need more care.“I thought I was just gonna be able to go in and get my work done,” she said. “I could have been more prepared,” she said. Leave this field empty if you’re human: There are a number of factors likely fueling those low treatment numbers. Many teens get mental health care through private providers, but those who move away from home often stop seeing them. Others get care through services specific to children and families, like school counseling or the foster care system.Age 18 is a particularly difficult time for a person to drop out of — or lose access to — mental health services. Those age 18 to 25 are more likely than the general adult population to report having serious mental illness, having serious thoughts of suicide, or to have attempted suicide. And as is the case across much of the U.S. population, the suicide rate for young adults has risen in recent years, climbing 76% between 2007 and 2017.Those numbers put in stark relief the urgent need to make sure teens have a bridge to mental health care in adulthood, experts said.Donohue started getting counseling two years into college, after becoming involved in a group for young Christian women. A staffer who was getting a master’s degree in mental health counseling took Donohue on as a patient during her training.Because the woman was an intern provider, the sessions were cheap enough that Donohue could scrape together cash to pay for them. With the help of therapy, she has fewer episodes of depression, fewer panic attacks, and a better understanding of her mental health conditions and how to cope with them. She’s now a graduate student intern who, as part of her own training, provides affordable therapy at a private practice. She graduates in December.“I slowly, slowly got into such a better place,” she said. “Thank God [counseling] happened. But it was a little bit late.”Colleen Sherry, 17, said she, her therapist, and her parents maintain an open loop of communication. Even when teens are able to make the jump to adult mental health care, the actual care they receive can look very different from what they’re used to with pediatric psychiatry. That, too, can be jarring — and discourage young people from keeping up with their care.“There’s a big disconnect between the pediatric psychiatry world and the adult psychiatry world,” Schechter said.Adolescent and adult care both hinge on cognitive behavioral therapy, counseling, and treatment with medications. But pediatric care places much more emphasis on parents, who are often involved in decision-making and care.“Me, my therapist, and my parents maintain a pretty open triangular loop,” said Colleen Sherry, a 17-year-old high school junior in Virginia who has obsessive compulsive disorder. Her parents take her to therapy, and talk to her therapist for the last 15 minutes of her hour-long appointment. She’s been seeing her therapist since sixth grade and hopes to keep seeing her after she turns 18 in October. Related: Related: Privacy Policy Tags mental health Related: After retractions of two Covid-19 papers, scientists ask what went wrong Please enter a valid email address. Looking back, she wishes she had searched online for counselors. But she was young, on her own, and swamped with classes and work. Even if she had found a provider, she doesn’t know how she would have paid for it.“I didn’t have money to go see a doctor when I needed to, I barely had money for textbooks, so counseling was out of the question,” she said.Donohue’s anxiety grew so intense that it got in the way of her daily life. During that time, the relationship she was in became abusive. She started self-harming again, developed an eating disorder, and attempted suicide.Her story is reflected again and again in the limited data available on mental health care among young people. In 2018, nearly 9% of 18 to 25 year olds in the U.S. reported having a major depressive episode in the past year so severe that it hindered their day-to-day life, according to federal data. Just over half of those young adults reported receiving treatment.There have been only a smattering of studies dedicated to looking at the transition from youth mental health care to adult psychiatry. Some have found a “precipitous decline” in care after teens turn 18. Others suggest that while treatment rates decline in transition-age youth, those changes aren’t concentrated right around a teen’s 18th birthday. Many of the most robust studies are based on long-outdated data.But mental health providers say it’s clear, from their practice, that low rates of mental health care after teens transition to adulthood presents a significant problem. But young people said no one prepared them for the often-complicated reality of navigating mental health care in adulthood: finding a therapist, filling prescriptions, scheduling appointments, shelling out co-pays.The data lay bare those difficulties. Young adults ages 18 to 25, for example, are more likely than any other adult age group to report having major depression in the past year — but the least likely to have received treatment. In 2018, just under half of 18-25 year olds with major depression said they got treatment for their condition.“We’re missing out on this major opportunity to support young people while mental health distress is emerging,” said Christine Moutier, a psychiatrist and the chief medical officer of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.advertisement Special ReportFacing a broken mental health system, many U.S. teens fall off a dangerous ‘cliff’ in their care Related: College can be brutal for students with serious mental health conditions. Here, they find support their schools can’t provide Maria Fabrizio for STAT There’s also a need for policies and programs to make sure transition-age youth get the mental health care they need. Experts said they are encouraged by the significant uptick in what are known as first episode psychosis programs, which aim to provide early, comprehensive care to young people who have recently experienced a psychotic episode for the first time. Studies have shown that young people who are funneled into such programs stay in treatment longer, see their symptoms improve more, and are more likely to stay in school or at work than young people in standard mental health care.Donohue and other young people told STAT that they share their experiences with mental health and lapses in care to make sure that teenagers know they aren’t alone and that it’s good to seek help during times of transition. Courtesy Katie DonohueCongress has significantly increased funding for first episode psychosis efforts in recent years through the Community Mental Health Block Grant Program. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, too, has started funding programs across the country in recent years to prevent transition-age youth with mental health conditions from falling through the cracks.But experts said there’s a need for more dedicated efforts, as well as increased awareness about the cliff itself. Mental health providers should be talking early, and thoroughly, with parents and teenagers about what the transition will look like. There shouldn’t be a cliff — there should be a bridge.“It should cross [a provider’s] mind a year before they discharge their patients,” Schechter said. “They should have a whole plan for the transition.”Many of the young people who spoke with STAT said they talk openly about their own experiences because they want other young people to know they’re not alone, that mental health conditions are common, and it’s good to get help, especially during times of big transition.“I just tell kids to be soft on themselves,” McKenzie said. “Be good to yourself, because it’s hard.”If you or someone you know is in crisis, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 or text HOME to 741741.  [email protected] Parents want to help their kids. Teens want authority over their mental health care. One state tries to balance both Experts say that has to change — particularly given the rising rate of suicide among young people.“We should be really be looking at this as a society,” Schechter said.In an ideal world, experts said, it would be easier for mental health providers — particularly those at outpatient and inpatient facilities that only treat children — to keep seeing patients until age 21 or even older. Some children’s mental health centers and providers already do that, or will at least keep 18-year-old patients on until they graduate.But for other providers, many of whom are already stretched thin, it would be exceedingly difficult to keep seeing patients past that point. That’s particularly true for allowing 18-year-olds to stay in inpatient psychiatric beds in adolescent units, which are already in short supply. They can also be admitted to adult units, whereas providers have nowhere else to place younger patients.“Unfortunately, right now, with the incredible demand for services, it’s hard for programs like us to do that,” said David Axelson, a psychiatrist who runs the behavioral health and psychiatry program at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.The hospital announced plans late last year to open a dedicated pediatric mental health facility. Right now, when teenage patients graduate, the hospital often refers them for therapy with an adult counselor and, in some cases, might allow them to keep the same psychiatrist for another year or two to ease the transition.“That’s not ideal,” he said. Related: Telehealth is a ‘silver lining’ of the pandemic, but implementing it permanently won’t be easy An 18th birthday can mean many things. It’s a formal step into adulthood. It’s the newfound right to vote, get a tattoo, join the armed forces, be called for jury duty.It’s also what some mental health providers know, anecdotally, as “the cliff,” the cutoff at which teens with mental health conditions are flung into adulthood, often without any preparation for the challenges to care ahead. Young adults are among the most at risk of major mental illness, but are among the least likely to get mental health care — which experts say is a huge, pressing problem.STAT spoke with teenagers, young adults, and mental health providers, and experts across the country to understand the experiences of young people with mental health conditions as they transition from adolescence to adulthood. It’s a time when they’re flooded with advice — from parents, from teachers, from the speakers at their high school graduation ceremonies.advertisement Mental health studies lump transgender teens under one umbrella — and miss clues to help them in the process @meggophone By Megan Thielking June 17, 2020 Reprintslast_img read more

CDC offers guidance on how to celebrate Easter safely

first_imgAdvertisementTags: CDCeasterguidelines AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments AdvertisementOtherwise, the safest option is celebrating outdoors. Advertisement Cruises in the US closer to resuming with CDC’s new trial guidance May 7, 2021 FORT MYERS, Fla. — If you’re gathering with family and friends this weekend for Easter, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reminding you to take precautions because we’re still fighting a pandemic.You can celebrate inside without a mask on only if you have been fully vaccinated, according to CDC guidance.The health agency is recommending that vaccinated people only visit people that live under the same roof.If you want to celebrate Easter inside and sit around the dinner table with family, the CDC is urging you to mask up and keep your distance. TSA screens record amount of travelers since start of pandemic May 18, 2021center_img CDC researchers study blue-green algae in SWFL waterways May 21, 2021 AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments RELATEDTOPICS CDC committee recommends lifting pause on J&J vaccines April 26, 2021 Advertisementlast_img read more

ASC reaches settlement with ex Rogers Gold president

Under the settlement agreement, Kirkham is to pay $25,000 to the ASC, including $5,000 in costs, and agreed not to trade securities, or act as a director and officer of any issuer, for seven years. He also admits that the OM used by Rogers Gold contained material omissions that could prevent a prospective investor from making an informed investment decision. Specifically, it says, that the OM failed to disclose the key terms of agreements between the company and various related companies; included a non-compliant technical report; and failed to disclose the involvement of a director who had prior run-ins with regulators. The deal also indicates that Kirkham was unaware of the inaccuracies in the OM and believed the document was compliant with securities laws. It says that he was largely uninvolved in the preparation of the disclosure, and that he relied extensively on the apparent expertise of, and submitted to the authority of, professionals hired by the firm to prepare the OMs. Moreover, it notes that he had no prior experience as a director or officer of a public company, and that he derived no financial benefit from his involvement with the firm — while he was paid $52,000 by the company, he also loaned it approximately $92,000, which is unlikely to be repaid. The Alberta Securities Commission (ASC) has settled with a former mining company executive over his responsibility for the company raising funds with deficient disclosure. The ASC announced that it has settled with former Rogers Gold Corp. president, Brian Kirkham, concerning allegations of illegal distributions and misrepresentations by the company in the offering memoranda (OM) used to sell securities. PwC alleges deleted emails, unusual transactions in Bridging Finance case James Langton Share this article and your comments with peers on social media BFI investors plead for firm’s sale Related news Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Mouth mechanic turned market manipulator Keywords EnforcementCompanies Alberta Securities Commission read more

Millennials dream big

first_img Related news Canadian millennials are more optimistic about their ability to afford their ideal retirement lifestyle compared to baby boomers, according to a survey released Wednesday by Bank of Montreal. The survey found that 47% of millennial respondents (aged 18-34) are positive about their ability to afford their ideal retirement lifestyle, compared to just one-third of boomers (aged 50-68). Earnings surge for Great-West Lifeco in Q4 In addition, millennials reported that they feel they would need, on average, more than $400,000 saved to live their ideal retirement lifestyle; $60,000 more than boomers reported. When comparing retirement savings targets, as well as RRSP savings to date for both age groups, millennials reported they would need an average of $441,610 saved for retirement. Millennials currently have an average of $15,194 saved in their RRSPs. Boomers said they would need an average of $385,184 saved for retirement, and currently have an average of $65,394 saved in their RRSPs. “Millennials are in an age category where they feel they have enough time to accomplish their retirement goals, whereas for boomers retirement is just around the corner, says Chris Buttigieg, senior manager, Wealth Planning Strategy, BMO Financial Group. “Millennials will soon find out that there will be many other priorities and life goals that will start to tug at the purse strings.” Buttigieg says millennials should take heed of any lessons learned from their parents on what works and what doesn’t with saving for retirement including managing debt, seeking professional financial advice and saving earlier in life. “The issue of time is an important one with retirement planning,” says Buttigieg. “There has been research focused on the benefit of saving and planning. What we have seen is that 72% of Canadians say they should have started saving for retirement before the age of 30, but only 41% actually did.” The study also identified the biggest concerns of both groups about retirement. The top worry for both millennials and boomers is not having enough saved to do all the things they want to do in retirement (40%and 44% respectively). Other worries identified included: Declining physical abilities and mobility, poor health and/or the prospect of dying , spending more money than they had planned and being bored. Survey finds Canadians aren’t sure how much they’ll need for retirement Keywords Retirement,  Millennials center_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Snowbirds win legal battle to reinstate out-of-province medical coverage Clare O’Hara Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Over 600,000 people get first dose of Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine

first_imgOver 600,000 people get first dose of Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine The government has today published figures which show the number of people who have received the vaccine between 8 December and 20 December in the UK is 616,933.The UK government has procured doses on behalf of the entire UK. The number of people who have received their first dose of the vaccine in each of the 4 nations is:England: 521,594Scotland: 56,676Wales: 22,595Northern Ireland: 16,068In line with advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), vaccines have been administered to care home residents, those aged 80 and over and health and social care staff through over 500 vaccination sites across the UK. The vaccination programme will continue at pace over Christmas.The vaccine roll-out in care homes in England began on Wednesday 16 December, with hundreds of residents vaccinated across 7 care homes in Slough, Aintree, Herne Bay, Thanet, Chalfont St Peter, Droitwich and Cheltenham, as well as Chelsea Pensioners.Larger care homes with 50 to 70 beds will be prioritised first, with around 2,900 care homes of this size in England.Over the coming weeks and months, the rate of vaccination will increase as more doses become available and the programme continues to expand, with more vaccines being delivered direct to care homes.Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said:Thanks to a huge effort from the NHS to overcome significant logistical challenges, 616,933 people across the UK have had their jab of the coronavirus vaccine.In just over 3 weeks, the NHS in every part of the UK has already set up hundreds of vaccination sites to ensure those most in need can receive their jab as quickly as possible.This is just the beginning and we are continually expanding our vaccination programme to help everyone get back to normal in the future.Figures on vaccination uptake for the UK will be published on a weekly basis from today on the PHE coronavirus data dashboard.The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine was the first vaccine to be authorised for use by the medicines regulator, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Patients require 2 doses of the vaccine for the vaccine to be at its most effective. Thanks to the work of the government’s Vaccines Taskforce, 40 million doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine have been secured for the whole of the UK.Rolling reviews on the Oxford/AstraZeneca, Moderna and other vaccine candidates are underway and, if authorised by the MHRA, will mean there are more doses available to vaccinate those in need.Vaccine Deployment Minister Nadhim Zahawi said:I am extremely proud the UK is the first country in the world to roll out the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine and protect the most vulnerable from this awful disease.The NHS across the UK is working incredibly hard to scale up the vaccination programme as fast as they can to make sure everyone on the priority list can get their vaccine easily.Background informationEnglandAll vaccinations in England are recorded between 8 December and 20 December and represent the first doses only.The data for England is drawn from 2 sources depending on the vaccination site:for hospital sites the data is reported from the National Immunisation Management Service, which is the system of record for the NHS vaccination programmefor local vaccination services this is an initial data extract from the Pinnacle system, which is being used by GPs to record COVID-19 vaccination events. This data will also be aggregated into the National Immunisation Management ServiceNorthern IrelandAs the vaccination programme began on 8 December 2020, the number of individuals reported to have been vaccinated in week ending 13 December 2020 only includes data from 8 to 13 December 2020.ScotlandVaccinations that were carried out in Scotland are reported in the Vaccination Management Tool. As the vaccination programme began on 8 December 2020, the number of individuals reported to have been vaccinated in week ending 13 December 2020 only includes data from 8 to 13 December 2020.WalesVaccinations that were carried out in Wales are reported in the Welsh Immunisation System, and are extracted each Tuesday to reflect activity up to the close of the preceding Sunday. As the vaccination programme began on 8 December 2020, the number of individuals reported to have been vaccinated in the week ending 13 December 2020 only includes data from 8 to 13 December 2020. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:coronavirus, covid-19, disease, future, Government, healthcare, hospital, Immunisation, Ireland, Minister, Scotland, Secretary, UK, UK Government, vaccination, vaccinelast_img read more

Queensland’s Natural Wonders Open and Good to Go

first_imgQueensland’s Natural Wonders Open and Good to Go Minister for the Environment and the Great Barrier Reef and Minister for Science and Youth Affairs The Honourable Meaghan ScanlonTravel-hungry Australians are being urged to visit Queensland to experience its unique and beautiful national parks and wildlife attractions.Environment and Great Barrier Reef Minister Meaghan Scanlon said there was no better time than now to visit the state’s world-famous natural wonders and family-friendly ecotourism activities, such as David Fleay Wildlife Park on the Gold Coast.“From the Great Barrier Reef to Whitehaven Beach, Carnarvon Gorge and the many national parks we have throughout the state – Queensland has something to offer everyone,” Minister Scanlon said.“Whether relaxing by the beach or camping or glamping in a national park, Australians starved for new experiences are sure to find something in Queensland that is on their travel bucket list.“Our national parks and wildlife attractions are open and good to go.”With ecotourism a vital element in the Palaszczuk Government’s plan to grow Queensland’s tourism industry, the Department of Environment and Science is investing in adventure and nature-based tourism across the state.“We are delivering some of Queensland’s first ecotourism experience for national parks such as glamping at the 102-kilometre Cooloola Great Walk and the $41.4 million Wangetti Trail, a 94-kilometre walking and mountain bike track stretching from Palm Cove to Port Douglas,” Ms Scanlon said.“By next year, the Palaszczuk Government will have delivered 100 tourism infrastructure projects throughout the state, many of which are ecotourism projects, and close to $400 million in new investment being delivered in partnership with the private sector right across Queensland.“These projects are creating jobs, stimulating the economy in surrounding regions, and encouraging increased tourism in those areas.”Minister Scanlon today inspected a new $40,000 immersive learning experience at David Fleay Wildlife Park which connects young people with wildlife and the environment in an educational setting.“Students will see wildlife up close, naturally displaying their unique behaviours, while our rangers help them learn about those incredible animals and the special habitat they live in,” Ms Scanlon said.“Young people are our future conservation champions and we hope by visiting the new room, they will learn more about our environment and the unique ecosystems within so they will do what they can to protect it.”Other Ecotourism projects include:$2.8 million revitalisation of Green Mountains Campground in Lamington National Park (O’Reilly’s – open)Australia’s first underwater hotel on the Great Barrier Reef (open – $10M project / Qld Govt Funding $2.75M)$10 million Scenic Rim Trail and Queensland’s only Great Walk of Australia (Spicers – open)$2 million upgrade and expansion of Hill Inlet Lookout on Whitsunday Island (completed – $1M Qld Govt funding)Australia’s first commercial ‘Via Ferrata’ climbing system at Binna Burra Lodge (under construction – $2.5M project / $1.67M Qld Govt Funding)Australia’s first fully glass-bottomed bridge at Cobbold Gorge in the Outback (open – $615,600 project / Qld Govt Funding $461,700)Upgrades and new experiences at Great Barrier Reef Island Resorts like the re-opening of Wilson Island and new eco-tents at Lady Elliot Island Eco-Resort (open) /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Burra, Carnarvon, conservation, environment, Gold Coast, Government, Great Barrier Reef, infrastructure, Investment, National Park, Palaszczuk, Port Douglas, QLD, Queensland, students, younglast_img read more

Businesses invited to meet WSU Vancouver students and alumni at Career Fair

first_img 0 Comments Inline FeedbacksView all comments Subscribe Connect with LoginI allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgreeNotify of new follow-up comments new replies to my comments I allow to use my email address and send notification about new comments and replies (you can unsubscribe at any time). Name*Email*Website Businesses invited to meet WSU Vancouver students and alumni at Career FairPosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Friday, January 10, 2020in: Business, Community Newsshare 0 The fair provides an opportunity for business representatives to meet WSU Vancouver students and alumni to discuss career and internship possibilities VANCOUVER – Businesses are invited to participate in Washington State University Vancouver’s Career & Internship Fair from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., Feb. 11 and 12 in the Firstenburg Student Commons on campus.The fair provides an opportunity for business representatives to meet WSU Vancouver students and alumni to discuss career and internship possibilities. Last year, more than 60 employer organizations attended.The first day will highlight a broad number of businesses. The second day will focus on nonprofit, public service and government-based organizations.Registration entitles employers to use of a 6-foot display table, fair entrance for two representatives, two parking permits and access to the Employer Lounge, where snacks and beverages will be provided. Cost to register is $200 for for-profit; $150 for government; and $75 for nonprofit organizations. Register online at vancouver.wsu.edu/cifer.For more information, contact Career Services at [email protected] or 360-546-9155.To request accommodations for a disability, contact the Access Center, [email protected] or (360) 546-9238.Information provided by Washington State University Vancouver Communications.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyVancouvershare 0 Previous : County council workshops Heritage Farm future Next : Cascade Park Community Library is getting a ‘refresh’AdvertisementThis is placeholder text I allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgreecenter_img Name*Email*Website guestLabel guestLabellast_img read more

Wave Technology Offers Ground-Breaking Tool for Cap Management and Precision Vinification

first_imgEmail ReddIt Facebook Twitter Home Video Wave Technology Offers Ground-Breaking Tool for Cap Management and Precision VinificationVideoWine Business EditorialWave Technology Offers Ground-Breaking Tool for Cap Management and Precision VinificationBy Editor – November 18, 2020 631 1 Previous articleParaguay Recognizes and Protects the Champagne Appellation of OriginNext articleMonroy Wines Releases Its Inaugural Vintage, a 2018 Cabernet Sauvignon Editor TAGSATPGroupLaurie WachterPARSECWINnovation Awards AdvertisementBy Laurie WachterATPgroup, a 2020 WINnovation Award winner Managing the cap in red wine fermentation requires a blend of science and art to yield the finished wine’s desired style. The winemaker’s decisions about breaking up and integrating the solid mass in the fermentor are the keys to delivering the correct color, precise mouthfeel and specific degree finish desired for that wine.The Air Mixing M.I.® (Modulated Injection) distributed by ATPgroup is an innovative step forward in the science of cap management. Developed by Parsec, an Italian company dedicated to designing and producing machines and control systems for precision vinification, this new technology manages the marc cap using an algorithm that creates disruptive waves inside the tank, resulting in homogenous mixing. Parsec has been honored with a 2020 WINnovation Award for its new technology.“Traditionally, you would do a pump-over every few hours to ensure you evenly extracted color and tannins from the grape,” says Max Buiani, Vice President Enological Process Sales at ATPGroup, a leading wine market supplier that distributes the Air Mixing M.I.®. “It was labor-intensive and risky because its repetitiveness opened you to making mistakes. You’d forget to connect a valve, or you’d connect a valve to the wrong tank. I’ve worked at many wineries, and this happened all the time.” This traditional process worked until tanks grew to be medium-sized, while the tools to manage the cap failed to keep pace. To address this, Parsec began to explore ways to improve the compressed gas injection technique. In the past, using compressed air resulted in large bubbles that either over-extracted the bitter compounds or only partially integrated the cap. During two years of studies, testing, trials and experiments, the company identified the flaws in these previous uses of bubbles to break up the marc cap, setting their development course.They now knew they needed to reduce the quantity of air or gas, move the nozzles previously mounted on the base of the tank, and find a way to completely break-up and immerse the cap. To achieve this, Parsec developed a system of nozzles that mount on the tank’s sides. The nozzles act independently but sequentially, creating a synergistic wave that smoothly moves the liquid in the tank at the computer’s command. The Air Mixing M.I.® (Modulated Injection) air injection creates disintegrating liquid waves that completely breaks up the mass of solids — grape skins, seeds, stems, pulp — from below, causing it to sink and fully integrate it with the liquid. “The waves keep adding layers and layers of fermentation,” Max points out. “And Parsec made the system intelligent with real-time, automated control of variations in temperature, nutrients and oxygen. It responds automatically as the fermentation evolves, making the waves more or less intense.”Although it is the science that Parsec advanced, they designed their unique intelligent platform, the SAEn5000, to ensure the art of winemaking remains firmly in the hands of the winery. The platform is interactive, giving the winery control of setting the operations for color extraction, oxygenation or temperature adjustment based on their protocols, the fermentation dynamics or thermodynamic profiles measured, or parameter interactions. It’s also possible to make adjustments throughout the fermentation process, and the computer will respond by automatically adapting the waves.“Another benefit with Air Mixing M.I.® (Modulated Injection) technology,” Max adds, “is that it reduces vinification time, eliminating the need to ‘dig out’ tanks. The winery can empty the tanks in less than half the time with less labor and without using a pump so that the winery can use the same tank at least twice during a harvest.”“Emptying the tank is also safer for the crew,” adds Elliot Bonior, Area Manager of Enological Process Sales, “since they don’t have to go into a small area with high levels of carbon dioxide to dig out those grape skins.”Larger wineries worldwide have benefited most from the Air Mixing M.I.® because they have the big tanks and are actively seeking cost-saving benefits of using less energy and less labor. “Air mixing is just one piece of the puzzle,” Elliot notes, emphasizing that smaller wineries can also take advantage of specific features that deliver the most benefit to them, like automating temperature or humidity control. A smaller winery might also benefit if they use tanks with unusual proportions such as narrow and tall tanks, which were Parsec’s initial design target, in addition to those with large volumes. The SAEn5000 is a multifunctional platform that connects the data from all tanks in the winery through a network that allows oversight and monitoring of the entire vinification process. This centralized supervision of tanks enables winemakers to select the most suitable maceration cycles and protocols for every variety based on the outcome they wish to achieve.“It can connect everything electrical,” Max says. “You might have 20 tanks using air mixing, and the system will ensure only one tank is running at a time. It can increase the valves for the cold, adjust the winery’s humidity, and manage every pump in the winery. It’s up to the winemaker to decide which of these tools to use.” Max explains that the SAEn5000 system allows wineries to develop protocols to manage the aroma in a wine and the fermentation speed. The computer automatically loads the set point of the temperatures, adds oxygen to speed up fermentation or adds nutrients. The system also uploads analytical data to the lab, which gives analysts the ability to drive real-time variations during fermentation.“In France, the system was used to automate the production of sparkling wines, which is extremely difficult because once you close the tank, there is nothing you can do. So the system monitors the vital parameters and controls or adjusts them as needed. The benefit to the winemaker is a more consistent result.“With this combination of flexibility and automation, and the ability to obtain fruity, full-bodied and balanced wine within just a few months from the drawing off, the use of the Air Mixing M.I.® is expanding rapidly around the world.  To learn more about Parsec’s WINnovation Award-winning product, contact Max Buiani at 707-888-5618 or [email protected] or Elliot Bonior at (805) 536-0156 or [email protected] Pinterest Share Linkedinlast_img read more

Bill to Modernize Public Procurement Tabled in the House

first_imgRelatedNew Tax Bill To Be Amended RelatedCustoms Revamps Authorised Economic Operator Programme RelatedDBJ Finalizing Legal Framework for Venture Capital Industry Advertisements Bill to Modernize Public Procurement Tabled in the House Finance & Public ServiceJuly 31, 2014Written by: Latonya Lintoncenter_img Story HighlightsA Bill aimed at modernizing Jamaica’s public procurement laws was laid in the House of Representatives on July 30.The Bill entitled, the Public Procurement Act, 2014 was tabled by Minister with responsibility for Public Service in the Ministry of Finance and Planning, Hon. Horace Dalley.Mr. Dalley said the law will reflect new policy thinking and international best practice in the area of public procurement. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail A Bill aimed at modernizing Jamaica’s public procurement laws was laid in the House of Representatives on July 30.The Bill entitled, the Public Procurement Act, 2014 was tabled by Minister with responsibility for Public Service in the Ministry of Finance and Planning, Hon. Horace Dalley.In a statement to the Lower House, Mr. Dalley said the law will reflect new policy thinking and international best practice in the area of public procurement.He said it will also provide for the establishment of the Procurement Policy Office, the Public Procurement Commission and strengthen and expand the function of the procurement review board that will regulate and harmonize the public procurement process.“(The Bill) also promotes economic development by ensuring value for money in public expenditure, and the participation in public procurement by qualified providers of goods, works and services, and to provide for other related matters,” Mr. Dalley stated.He said the move towards a new comprehensive law governing public procurement is intended to simplify and streamline the legislative framework and create enforceable and bidding obligations for persons involved in procurement.“It will also provide for criminal sanctions for persons found guilty of benefitting through corrupt means from public procurement,” Mr. Dalley said.The Bill will also delete from the Contractor General’s Act, all provisions related to the National Contracts Commission (NCC), which is to be replaced by the new Public Procurement Commission.The methods of procurement have also been expanded, and the circumstances in which bidding occurs expanded to include two stages, open and closed framework agreements, as well as electronic government procurement.A Joint Select Committee of Parliament is to be established to examine the legislation.last_img read more